Tag Archives: WWII

ALONE IN BERLIN

“…director Vincent Perez – resisting the temptation to pad things out with dubious filler or the concoction of unnecessarily distracting back stories…”

Wayward Wolf.

The death of their only son in combat has driven a German couple to risk their own lives in defiance of the Führer himself.

Provoked by a combination of deep-set grief and simmering resentment, Otto Quangel (Brendan Gleeson), is determined to make a stand against what he perceives to be an unjust, brutal Nazi regime. His wife, Anna (Emma Thompson), refuses to allow Otto to do such a thing alone, and by association, therefore becomes the accomplice to his plans.

Painstakingly Otto begins the laborious task of disguising his handwriting in order to create almost 290 cards, each of which is emblazoned with a strong anti-authoritarian message of defiance, something he refers to as “Freie Presse” (free press). Each of these he then deposits in strategic public locations around the city of Berlin, hopeful that his anarchic messages will incite some form of radical response from a down-trodden German public.

No matter their impact on the psyche of the German people, it transpires that all but eighteen of these cards will ultimately be turned in to the authorities by a public too frightened not to do so.

Predictably, Otto and Anna’s actions soon prompt something of a manhunt in the City.

Brendan Gleeson and particularly Emma Thompson put in fine performances as a couple riddled with sorrow and driven to the point where they no longer have anything to lose, but it is arguably Daniel Brühl’s performance as the rather weasel-ish police detective, Escherich, that steals the limelight here. His persual of “the threat” posed by Otto and Anna becomes something of an obsession. Frequently out-thought or wrong-footed in his endeavours, he is willing to betray anyone, and do literally anything to solve a case which threatens to get away from him; particularly once the SS get involved, ramping up the pressure to close the net on the elusive pair of renegades.

Although nicely shot and well-paced, Alone in Berlin is a fairly straight forward premise, and judged on such criteria, there’s perhaps not enough to really make it stand out from an historically long and illustrious back catalogue of Second World War-themed film-making. That said, Alexandre Desplat’s soundtrack is memorable and worthy of mention. Suitably evocative, it successfully conjures up a bleak mood of despair with its refreshingly traditional use of  both recurring themes and motifs, embellishing the film significantly and substantially.

On balance, Alone in Berlin delivers well. Both engaging and suspenseful, one can put this down to a number of factors, but primarily owing to director Vincent Perez resisting the temptation to pad things out with dubious filler or the concoction of unnecessarily distracting back stories, allowing instead a refreshingly concise and to-the-point retelling of Otto and Anna’s fraught, daring and ultimately fool-hardy act of resistance against a wicked ideology.

Well worth a watch.

 

 

 

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CHURCHILL

“…David Higgs has worked some magic here, conjuring  up some of the stand-out cinematography of the year to date.”

Wayward Wolf.

A few years back a statue of Winston Churchill that stands outside the Houses of Parliament in London, was desecrated by protestors. I forget why. It was nothing personal against him if memory serves sufficiently, and the perpetrators were swiftly rounded upon by most of British society.

Let’s face it, whether you concur or not, it’s a very sticky wicket that you’ll bat upon if you decide to disparage anything relating to that particular period of British political history, let alone the seemingly Teflon wartime Prime Minister himself.

But this protective attitude, or rather a slight reversal of it, is what makes Churchill such an intriguing biopic.

The film focuses on the tail end of World War II, a time in which Churchill’s usefulness as a military tactician was fast being called into question. It was after all the minds of General Bernard Montgomery of the Allied forces and General Dwight D. Eisenhower of the U.S army that were overseeing the implementation of the impending pivotal Operation Overlord.

Churchill, in comparison, whilst undoubtedly committed to the last, was perceived now as something of a dinosaur; increasingly out of touch with the technology and methods of modern warfare, despite his insistence that there was much that could be learned from the lessons of World War I.

At least that is how he is portrayed in Jonathan Teplitzky’s piece.

A stubborn, sometimes belligerent old man, he is portrayed wonderfully well by Brian Cox. Rarely without twin props of cigar and tumbler of Scotch in hand, he shuffles about from here to there, insistent upon being at the centre of everything and having a decisive say in all matters. It becomes increasingly clear, however, that owing to his age, this can no longer be the case. He is depicted as a proud man struggling to accept that he is nearing the time when perhaps he has outstayed his usefulness as a fully hands-on Prime Minister. Instead, with King George VI in agreement (James Purefoy), a new era is ushered in; an era of Winston Churchill ‘The Statesman’ – whether he likes it or not.

His long-suffering wife, Clementine (the excellent Miranda Richardson), is portrayed as a woman somewhat battle-hardened from a life duelling with an unshakeably headstrong husband. Theirs seems to be a union of respectful support and dependability above anything else.

Although Teplitzky’s film veers away from any temptation to depict the conflict itself, the heightened emotions and sense of trepidation of impending battle are brilliantly captured through the interplay between Churchill (Cox), Eisenhower (John Slattery) and Montgomery (Julian Wadham). We are left in no doubt of the sheer gravitas of the situation that confronts the three men, all of whom acknowledge – to varying degrees – a duty of care to minimise potential troop fatalities, whilst still appreciative of the need for strong, single-minded decision making for ‘the greater good’.

It’s visually a most seductive film that leans heavily on the use of sweeping vistas, some beautiful staged ‘stills’ and the use of striking silhouetted imagery. Certainly David Higgs has worked some magic here, conjuring  up some of the stand-out cinematography of the year to date.

Quite how historically accurate a portrayal of Winston Churchill this is, might well be open to debate, but it makes for an intriguing study of a much revered historical figure in a guise that perhaps won’t be entirely familiar to all.