Tag Archives: Macbeth

LADY MACBETH

Lady Macbeth is a simple, powerful and above all hugely memorable film.”

Wayward Wolf.

My own relative theatrical ignorance paid off handsomely with this preview screening of Director William Oldroyd’s adaptation of Nikolai Leskov’s novella, Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk.

Based in some small part on William Shakespeare’s character, Macbeth, it tells the story of a young lady, Katherine (Florence Pugh), sold into marriage, along with a worthless piece of land. It’s a close call as to which of the deal’s two assets is of less value to the purchaser and needless to say, the marriage is entirely inadequate and loveless, thanks in the main to the husband whose inability to consummate the relationship appears to have driven him to become a bitter and hurtful piece of work, if he wasn’t just that already, that is.

Together with his sour-faced father, they barely give Katherine the time of day, yet are insistent that she adheres to the son’s every whim, wish and demand.

The calling away of both husband and father on a matter of some urgency begins a chain of events in Katherine’s life that will completely re-shape it forever. The catalyst for such a dramatic turnabout is the appearance of a newly-hired stable hand, Sebastian (Cosmo Jarvis), whose mischievous, rugged and earthy charms ignite deep, lustful passions within Katherine; urges that she simply can’t help but act upon.

But having tasted this particular forbidden fruit, there really is no going back considering the stunted, soulless alternative on offer to her. Indeed, Katherine really might just do about anything to ensure that this new found freedom to both be herself again and to begin to impose some authority about the place, is never denied her again.

Lady Macbeth, whilst being by definition a period drama, feels far more contemporary in its approach and outlook than that. Sparse and minimal in its direction, it’s a piece refreshingly devoid of unnecessary clutter and it never attempts to overcomplicate what is essentially a very simple, straightforward plot. Instead, director William Oldroyd concentrates on both strong characterisation and ensuring that the narrative is delivered with unconfused precision and impact.

Florence Pugh plays her part with assured aplomb, gradually morphing from patient obedience, into reckless, scheming abandon. She is very much a young woman who recognises that her time has come, and is unafraid to use and manipulate those around her, partly out of desperation, yet ultimately for her own selfish gain.

Lady Macbeth is a simple, powerful and above all hugely memorable film, delivered expertly by all involved.

Highly recommended.