Tag Archives: Isabelle Huppert

The Wayward Wolf Annual Film Awards – 2017:

WWAFA Wolf Image 2017

Well, didn’t 2017 just fly by, folks?

And with the spectre of death looming ever larger over each and every one of us, the Wayward Wolf is here once again to make some sense of it all by picking over the bones of the year (just gone) in film, with the…

2017 Wayward Wolf Film Awards (The WWAFAS)!

76 (that’s SEVENTY-SIX) films were viewed on the big screen this year, one more than in 2016, and it has to be said that the standard was mind bogglingly good at times. So good in fact that there’s virtually nothing in it between the top ten entries. Indeed, picking the best film was harder this year than in any of the preceding four or five years that I’ve been doing all of this reviewing malarkey.

I should also acknowledge that there were a few choice films released in 2017 which seem to be have received all manner of rave reviews yet somehow slipped through my net for one reason or another, such as: God’s Own Country, Happy End, I am Not Your Negro, Good Time to name but four. Do bear this in mind then before bemoaning their lack of inclusion!

Lastly, you’ll notice that there is an absence of a Best Documentary category this year. Despite having seen any number of them on television during the year – including some magnificent serialised OJ Simpson and Vietnam documentaries, not to mention the brilliant Jim & Andy – unusually (for me), I’ve barely managed to see any on the big screen during 2017. Hopefully that’s something that can be rectified in 2018.

Don’t forget, it’s only films viewed in a cinema by yours truly – with a 2017 UK release date – that have been considered in the final reckoning.

And so, without anymore to-do, it’s on with the show…


This Year’s WWAFA Categories:

1. Best Soundtrack

2. Best Foreign Language Film

3. Best Actress (Lead or support)

4. Best Actor (Lead or support)

5. Worst Film

6. Best Film

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Best Original Soundtrack:


The Top Five: (in descending order):

5. It’s Only the End of the World  – Gabriel Yared

4. Jackie – Mica Levi

3. A Ghost Story – Daniel Hart

2. La La Land Justin Hurwitz

But the winner is…

1. Hans ZimmerDunkirk

As excellent as many other soundtracks have been in 2017, this year there was a clear winner. Hans Zimmer’s superb score is a precision piece of work complimenting magnificently Christopher Nolan’s epic vision of war. I’ve seen this relationship described as perfectly symbiotic, and truly it is. A superbly powerful emotionally charged soundtrack and a thoroughly deserving winner.

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Best Foreign Language Film:


The Top Five: (in descending order):

5. It’s Only the End of the World

4. The Handmaiden

3. Raw

2. En Man Som Heter Ove (A Man Called Ove)

But the winner is…

1. Toni Erdmann

Sandra Hüller’s subtle performance is absolutely spot on in Maren Ade’s wonderful film which fuses “a mostly subtle strand of comedy with an underlying melancholia in this absorbing tale of a disfunctional father/daughter relationship.”

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Best Actress:


Narrowly missing out on the top five in 2017, it’s only fair that we acknowledge the following brilliant performances:

Florence Pugh and her gloriously conniving performance in Lady MacBeth.

Teresa Palmer’s excellent portrayal of a girl held captive against her will in Berlin Syndrome.

Jennifer Lawrence’s breathtaking adrenalin-charged performance in Mother.

Sandra Hüller’s splendid performance in Toni Erdmann.

And Clare Foy, Julia Roberts and Natalie Portman for their roles in Breathe, Wonder and Jackie respectively.


The Top Five: (in descending order):

5. Tatiana Maslany – Stronger

4. Viola Davis Fences

3. Annette Bening Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool

2. Ellie Kendrick – The Levelling

But the winner is…

1. Isabelle Huppert – Elle:

A reassuringly superb performance from Huppert as “a woman whose experiences earlier in life have resulted in something of a twisted psyche…”
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Best Actor:


Some truly memorable performances in 2017, and it would be remiss of me not to mention the handful that narrowly missed the cut:

Andrew Garfield had quite the year when you consider that his superb performances in both Silence and Breathe weren’t even his best performances of the year!

Terrific performances also from:

Jake Gyllenhaal in Stronger, Michael Keaton in The Founder, Geoffrey Rush in Final Portrait, both Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet in Call Me By Your Name and Jamie Bell in Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, whilst Vincent Cassel’s rage-fuelled performance in It’s Only the End of the World was also a big highlight.

The Top Five: (in descending order):

5. Jim Broadbent – The Sense Of An Ending

4.  Willem Dafoe – The Florida Project

3. Casey AffleckManchester By the Sea

2. Andrew GarfieldHacksaw Ridge

But the winner is…

1. Denzel Washington – Fences:

An absolute masterclass from the ever impressive Denzel Washington, one part of a hugely impressive ensemble cast.

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Worst Film:


As was the case in 2016, there were reassuringly few poor films this year (at least this was the case with regard to the films that I saw, personally), and so, as with last year, there are just the three worst film entries in this particular category…

The Top Three: (in descending order):

3. Hampstead

2. Alien Covenant


But the winner is…

1. Denial

There are almost certainly umpteen more ‘conventionally’ awful films from 2017 than Director Mick Jackson’s Denial – a film which may well boast the likes of Timothy Spall and Rachel Weisz amongst its impressive cast, but sometimes it’s simply a film’s totally one-eyed unbalanced approach to its subject matter that’s enough to infuriate sufficiently and earn it the ‘not so’ coveted, Worst Film WWAFA.

Denial is most definitely one such film.

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Best Film:


Ten absolutely tremendous films, but there can be only one winner…


The Top Ten (in descending order):

10. The Handmaiden 

9. La La Land 

8. Fences

7. A Ghost Story

6. Raw

5. En Man Som Heter Ove (A Man Called Ove)

4. Toni Erdmann

3. Mother

2. Manchester By The Sea


But the winner, and Wayward Wolf Film Of The Year for 2017, is…


1. The Florida Project

It was always going to take something special to pip the rest to the post this year, and Sean Baker’s wonderful The Florida Project had all the right ingredients to do just that. Enchanting, moving and uplifting… “as poignant and wonderful an observational slice-of-life tale as you’re ever likely to see.”


So that’s it for another year!

It only remains to wish everyone an excellent 2018 and to leave you all with the full and final 76-strong, Wayward Wolf film list for 2017.


Ciao for now.

The Full 2017 Wayward Wolf Film List (in order of preference):

1. The Florida Project

2. Manchester By the Sea

3. Mother

4. Toni Erdmann

5. En Man Som Heter Ove (A Man Called Ove)

6. Raw

7. A Ghost Story

8. Fences

9. La La Land

10. The Handmaiden

11. Lion

12. The Sense of an Ending

13. Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool

14. Certain Women

15. It Comes at Night

16. The Founder

17. Lady MacBeth

18. American Made

19. The Party

20. A Monster Calls

21. Dunkirk

22. Get Out

23. The Red Turtle

24. It’s Only the End of the World

25. Elle

26. Moonlight

27. Call Me By Your Name

28. The Levelling

29. Blade Runner 2049

30. Berlin Syndrome

31. The Lost City of Z

32. The Beguiled

33. Gifted

34. Wind River

35. Stronger

36. T2 Trainspotting

37. Breathe

38. Hacksaw Ridge

39. Baby Driver

40. Wonder

41. Churchill

42. Alone in Berlin

43. Hidden Figures

44. Mountain

45. The Glass Castle

46. Mindhorn

47. Final Portrait

48. The Killing of a Sacred Deer

49. The Death of Stalin

50. Hell on Earth

51. The Ritual

52. Murder on the Orient Express

53. Detroit

54. Logan (Noir)

55. The Belko Experiment

56. Jackie

57. Their Finest

58. Life

59. War for the Planet of the Apes

60. Silence

61. Borg vs McEnroe

62. IT

63. Star Wars: The Last Jedi

64. Kong – Skull Island

65. Tiszta Szívvel (Kills on Wheels)

66. The Secret Scripture

67. Ghost in the Shell

68. Suburbicon

69. Jigsaw

70. Colossal

71. The Snowman

72. Power Rangers

73. Fai Bei Sogni (Sweet Dreams)

74. Hampstead

75. Alien Covenant

76. Denial



“…this is a woman whose experiences earlier in life have resulted in something of a twisted psyche…”

Wayward Wolf.

When the central theme of your film is that of brutal rape, yet the gravity of such an incident is then somewhat downplayed, and almost brushed off by the victim herself, it tells you that this is not a conventional Director’s take on the well worn theme of unwarranted assault and retribution.

No stranger to sexual or violent content in his films, Director Paul Verhoeven takes hold of the reins in this his slightly warped thriller, Elle.

Michèle Leblanc (the reassuringly superb, Isabelle Huppert), is the boss of a successful video games company. She is gradually revealed to be head-strong in character, yet slightly unbalanced in both her demeanour and actions. This can almost certainly be attributed to the fact that she is the product of a highly disturbed childhood – her father having been an appalling and reviled convicted mass murderer – which has rendered Michèle a somewhat erratic personality, and rather emotionally detached from the events that occur in her day to day life.

Michèle falls prey to a masked intruder on her own doorstep, and a forceful sexual assault takes place. Far from exhibiting the behavioural patterns of hysteria and self-loathing that we might have expected, she doesn’t so much as even notify the police, instead choosing to remain calm and carry on.

It’s curious behaviour to say the least, but one senses that this is a woman whose experiences earlier in life have resulted in something of a twisted psyche, enabling her to just accept things that others would consider far too taboo or utterly repellent.

It becomes apparent that Michèle’s rape was not in fact an isolated incident when a personalised pornographic animation is emailed to her at work, this time portraying her, once again, as the victim of a rape. True to character, Michèle calmly sets about trying to track down the perpetrator believing, understandably, that it must be someone from the workplace, and that these two recent events must therefore be linked.

But, we must consider that she works in an industry accepting of what would otherwise be considered extreme or sexually inappropriate, yet one that justifies such content by compartmentalising it into something rather more fantastical and crucially, unreal. It should also be considered that Michèle’s rather quirky ‘anything goes’ personality is something of a magnet of attraction for a rather unstable friend-base. The chief protagonist of a workplace stunt such as this therefore may be much harder to get to the bottom of than it could have been in anyone else’s walk of life.

With all of this and an exhibitionist elderly mother who enjoys living disgracefully with men less than half her age, it’s probably of some personal relief to Michèle that the kindly new neighbours that have moved in next door seem to be upstanding characters, and offer her, crucially, a stable influence in her life. They are very much the antithesis of the often self-inflicted car crash that Michèle’s life can have a tendency to degenerate into, with only the tiniest amount of effort.

The neighbours – Patrick in particular ( Laurent Lafitte), will play an increasingly influential part in her life, but if there’s one thing that Michèle has learnt, it’s that appearances can sometimes be deceptive, leaving her to ponder exactly which people she can really trust, and what their real motives may be?

Elle is a brilliantly spun web of intrigue and dysfunction, and Michèle is very much the common denominator at its very centre.

Paul Verhoeven paints this middle aged woman as something of a dichotomy. On the one hand she’s a stylish lady in control of her affairs and actions, yet on the other, a woman with self-destructive tendencies, only too willing to surrender all control, along with any self-respect that she possesses.

Verhoeven’s Elle is a psychologically intense piece, in which he positively delights in challenging his audience, pushing the boundaries with risqué, confrontational content, and in the process, blurs all lines of division between the concept of ‘victim’ and ‘perpetrator’.

Whilst it may not possess the sort of twist or reveal that you might have anticipated, Elle is far more than just a simple whodunit or thriller. A twisted, stylish, tense and intriguing piece that will leave you dissecting its unsettling characters, ideas and concepts for quite some time to come.