Tag Archives: Brian Cox

DARKEST HOUR

 

Four Star Rating

“No less impressive is Bruno Delbonnel’s absolutely beautiful cinematography, which positively shimmers through its artistic use of silhouettes and subtle lighting techniques.” – Wayward Wolf.

Darkest Hour examines the rise to power and early Prime Ministry of Winston Churchill. Churchill (Gary Oldman), is portrayed as being far from an establishment line-toeing ‘yes man’ – unlike existing Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain (Ronald Pickup) – who, if the exaggerated handkerchief waving and heightened levels of vitriol emanating from the House of Commons are anything to go by, has clearly lost the confidence of both his own party and the entirety of the political opposition.

Chamberlain will resign and his party will then move quickly to choose a successor, in the interests of both the existing government, but more pressingly, to ensure that a strong level of leadership exists during war time.

Viscount Halifax (Stephen Dillane) – the party’s unanimous choice to succeed Chamberlain – surprisingly declines the offer. Step forward then one Winston Churchill. A less popular choice within his own party, once couldn’t imagine. Perceived to be something of a renegade and a loose cannon, the government is loathe to appoint him, but appoint him they ultimately do, only to soon regret the folly of their decision.

Whereas Jonathan Teplitzky’s 2017 effort, Churchill – featuring a similarly commanding central performance from Brian Cox – paid greater attention to Churchill’s faltering psychological state and the relationship that he shared with his wife and all-round pillar of strength, Clemmie, Joe Wright is more concerned here with Churchill the politician, as he sets about his work like some kind of force of nature, ruffling feathers as he goes with his dogged determination that Britain should not compromise and surrender to a tyrant that threatens the long-term freedom of the peoples of Europe.

Joe Wright’s film is hugely impressive in many ways. Most striking of all – and every bit the headline-grabber – is Gary Oldman’s absolute tour-de-force performance as this mostly unshakeably single-minded of first ministers. It should be noted though that Oldman’s portrayal of Churchill’s less decisive quieter moments of self-doubt are as equally worthy of praise as his portrayal of the call-to-arms, rebel-rousing speeches for which Churchill is so well known and revered.

No less impressive is Bruno Delbonnel’s absolutely beautiful cinematography, which positively shimmers through its artistic use of silhouettes and subtle lighting techniques. Perhaps most notable of all though is the imaginative and innovative staging and choice of shots. It’s as clear as day here that this is truly the stuff of Oscar nominations.

If there’s to be one criticism it’s perhaps the inclusion of a scene in the film’s latter stages which I’m fairly confident is the stuff of fiction, in which Winston Churchill goes on something of a fact-finding / soul-searching mission.

Changing the habit of a lifetime, he rides the London Underground to Westminster rather than being ferried about by a personal driver. Whilst doing so he engages in a number of conversations with understandably shocked and bewildered passengers in an attempt to gauge the thoughts and feelings of the general public with regards to the increasingly desperate scenario confronting them all – the very real possibility that the allies will suffer defeat during the early exchanges of World War II.

No matter how heart-felt and useful a scene this may well be with which to portray Churchill as being ‘truly a man of the people’, I’d argue that it is also rather out of place within the context of the film as a whole. It all seems like something of an ill-fitting after thought, and threatens to undo some of the excellent work that has preceded it, though I appreciate that this will of course be entirely subjective.

Nevertheless, don’t let this minor quibble distract from what is otherwise an absolutely stupendous piece of film-making, beautifully and lovingly put together with direction that successfully blends the artistic with the popular.

Despite its dependance upon heavy dialogue and weighty subject matter, Joe Wright’s Darkest Hour nonetheless remains easily accessible and absolutely simmers with emotion.

One of the finest biopics for many a long year.

 

 

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CHURCHILL

“…David Higgs has worked some magic here, conjuring  up some of the stand-out cinematography of the year to date.”

Wayward Wolf.

A few years back a statue of Winston Churchill that stands outside the Houses of Parliament in London, was desecrated by protestors. I forget why. It was nothing personal against him if memory serves sufficiently, and the perpetrators were swiftly rounded upon by most of British society.

Let’s face it, whether you concur or not, it’s a very sticky wicket that you’ll bat upon if you decide to disparage anything relating to that particular period of British political history, let alone the seemingly Teflon wartime Prime Minister himself.

But this protective attitude, or rather a slight reversal of it, is what makes Churchill such an intriguing biopic.

The film focuses on the tail end of World War II, a time in which Churchill’s usefulness as a military tactician was fast being called into question. It was after all the minds of General Bernard Montgomery of the Allied forces and General Dwight D. Eisenhower of the U.S army that were overseeing the implementation of the impending pivotal Operation Overlord.

Churchill, in comparison, whilst undoubtedly committed to the last, was perceived now as something of a dinosaur; increasingly out of touch with the technology and methods of modern warfare, despite his insistence that there was much that could be learned from the lessons of World War I.

At least that is how he is portrayed in Jonathan Teplitzky’s piece.

A stubborn, sometimes belligerent old man, he is portrayed wonderfully well by Brian Cox. Rarely without twin props of cigar and tumbler of Scotch in hand, he shuffles about from here to there, insistent upon being at the centre of everything and having a decisive say in all matters. It becomes increasingly clear, however, that owing to his age, this can no longer be the case. He is depicted as a proud man struggling to accept that he is nearing the time when perhaps he has outstayed his usefulness as a fully hands-on Prime Minister. Instead, with King George VI in agreement (James Purefoy), a new era is ushered in; an era of Winston Churchill ‘The Statesman’ – whether he likes it or not.

His long-suffering wife, Clementine (the excellent Miranda Richardson), is portrayed as a woman somewhat battle-hardened from a life duelling with an unshakeably headstrong husband. Theirs seems to be a union of respectful support and dependability above anything else.

Although Teplitzky’s film veers away from any temptation to depict the conflict itself, the heightened emotions and sense of trepidation of impending battle are brilliantly captured through the interplay between Churchill (Cox), Eisenhower (John Slattery) and Montgomery (Julian Wadham). We are left in no doubt of the sheer gravitas of the situation that confronts the three men, all of whom acknowledge – to varying degrees – a duty of care to minimise potential troop fatalities, whilst still appreciative of the need for strong, single-minded decision making for ‘the greater good’.

It’s visually a most seductive film that leans heavily on the use of sweeping vistas, some beautiful staged ‘stills’ and the use of striking silhouetted imagery. Certainly David Higgs has worked some magic here, conjuring  up some of the stand-out cinematography of the year to date.

Quite how historically accurate a portrayal of Winston Churchill this is, might well be open to debate, but it makes for an intriguing study of a much revered historical figure in a guise that perhaps won’t be entirely familiar to all.