Tag Archives: Anne Hathaway

Colossal

“By the end, even the director seems to have given up the ghost if the clumsy, half-baked final chapter is anything to go by. “

Wayward Wolf.

Colossal falls into the category of ‘quirky’ cinema. Quirky cinema then tends to divide into one of two categories: ‘well written, surprisingly deep and meaningful beneath the quirkiness’ or ‘quirky for quirky’s sake’.

This Nacho Vigalondo directed piece is entrenched firmly in the latter camp.

Politely yet firmly nudged out of her (her boyfriend’s) New York apartment, unemployed party girl, Gloria, (Anne Hathaway), returns to her home town. There, she stays in an empty, furniture-less house that presumably belongs to her, though this is not established. Here in small town America she intends to get her life back on track again.

A chance meeting with Oscar (Jason Sudeikis) – an old acquaintance whom she vaguely recalls from their primary school days together – is initially a positive thing. Oscar owns a bar and invites Gloria to work there, at least until she’s settled back in the area again.

Gloria accepts and she, Oscar and a couple of other regulars strike up a sort of ‘after hours’ friendship, and her life soon drifts back into an all too familiar routine of late nights and alcohol.

It’s only when news comes from South Korea that a giant monster has begun to terrorise residents of Seoul, that Gloria’s unspectacular small town existence begins to liven up through a quite astonishing discovery. She is somehow connected directly to these herculean happenings that are playing out on the other side of the world.

It seems that at 8.05 am each morning, whatever physical movements that Gloria makes within the bounds of a local kids playground, are replicated exactly by the Godzilla-esque beast so many thousands of miles away. But whereas Gloria’s footsteps are merely innocent shuffles through the Autumn leaves, the monster’s are huge destructive hammer blows to both Seoul’s buildings and to its people in the streets below.

It’s certainly a ludicrous not to mention hugely ambitious narrative that director Vigalondo must sell to his audience, and one that consequently requires a massive suspension of disbelief on their part, to put it mildly.

Unfortunately, the whole shebang suffers badly from a combination of poor writing, ill-explained phenomena and plot holes as large as the monster’s considerable footprints. Despite Hathaway and Sudeikis putting in convincing turns in the film’s key roles, Colossal sadly comes across as little more than an incoherent, mad adrenalin rush of overblown ideas. By the end, even the director seems to have given up the ghost if the clumsy, half-baked final chapter is anything to go by.

Yes, there are clearly metaphors at play here, and there’s something of a back story to consider which should help to make better sense of things, but all such subtle devices seem so hopelessly lost within the film’s bungling storyline.

To some extent, Colossal masquerades as innovative film-making, hiding as it does  behind a certain level of deceptive quirkiness. It may well have been Vigalondo’s noble intention to swerve all things cliched and unoriginal, and full marks for that, but ultimately, like so many before him, the allure of Hollywood proves to be too seductive. In a flurry of contrived nonsense, and amidst a tidal wave of mildly motivated Korean extras, Colossal trundles haphazardly towards its inevitable conclusion.

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FILM REVIEW: Interstellar

I’ve seen far-off planets, failing planets, new planets, star constellations and alternate universes.

I’ve witnessed black holes, worm holes and event horizons.

I’ve looked on in awe at mile-high tidal waves and vast dust storms sweeping mercilessly across American corn rows.

I’ve observed flying craft docking in deep outer-space and marvelled at mind-bending quantum physics.

I’ve seen astronauts struggle with matters of the heart, of life and death; the birth of new generations and the cryogenic preservation of the old…

…and on top of all of this, I’ve been vibrationally rattled to the back teeth by an impressive Odeon, IMAX sound system.

Yet somehow I still feel curiously dissatisfied?

But why?

Interstellar, incase you’ve been living on some far-away planet for the last few months, is a story of space exploration and an attempt to colonise new planets on which the human race can re-start; a situation brought about by the increasingly uninhabitable nature of planet earth.

Matthew McConnaughey puts in a heavyweight lead performance of some note and he’s well supported by Hollywood’s finest. Anne Hathaway, John Lithgow, Matt Damon and even the old master, Michael Caine all put in strong performances, key to Interstellar’s plot.

Special effects (achieved impressively without the use of CGi) are very special indeed; big, bold and convincing, yet still organic and with a very ‘real’ feel to them.

There’s a strong and distinct storyline and the dialogue is mercifully, relatively schmaltz-free and believable.

Indeed, there’s actually so much to admire about Interstellar and the hugely ambitious cinematic project that it undoubtedly is, but therein lies the problem; it actually feels simply too ambitious.

On the one hand we have a very human story of the tight bonds of family and of love and longing, whilst on the other (and at times it could be said, rather shoe-horned in), we have an improbable story of space adventure, discovery and a dabble into the world of quantum physics. Even if we suspend our disbelief for a moment and take the film on face value, for what it really is, Interstellar just doesn’t convincingly marry these two elements together; to my eyes at least.

That said, you can see what Christopher Nolan was trying to achieve and there are very definitely moments of great poignancy and emotion throughout, as well as a big, cinematic dose of the  ‘wow’ factor thrown in, as you might expect from a Christopher Nolan offering.

I have a hunch that Interstellar will actually improve through repeat watchings. It’s certainly the sort of film that would benefit from it, if only to fully comprehend and appreciate some of the more complex, scientific concepts and ideas covered.

It’s a long film, yet strangely it never really allows us the ‘time and space’ to truly ponder and contemplate the enormity of the subject matter; instead we are whisked along in a fast and furious succession of thrills, spills and set pieces.

Credit to Nolan, he maintains this momentum throughout; no mean feat for a movie that clocks in at a bum-numbing 166 minutes, but it is at times somewhat at the expense of what is essentially a rather moving ‘human’ sub-plot.

I can’t help making comparisons with the 2013 film ‘Gravity’ which, whilst perhaps not being quite as ambitious, scientifically-speaking, was nevertheless a film that I feel was far more successful in blending the disparate aspects of space adventure with matters of the heart and resulted in a film that simply worked, from start to finish.

It is of course not a sci-fi competition though and I’d urge anyone to go and see Interstellar; you’d actually be missing out if you didn’t.

It’s a very enjoyable three hours or so and a lot of love and dedication has been put into its creation, that much is obvious; just don’t be expecting the hollywood classic that it’s been painted out to be…

…it isn’t.