TISZTA SZÍVVEL (Kills on Wheels)

“The chief success of Tiszta Svívvel is its ability to switch confidently and effectively between the thoughtful, the action-packed and the at times downright ridiculous…”

Wayward Wolf.

Tiszta Svívvel (re-badged for the UK market as: Kills on Wheels) is the latest offering from Hungarian writer and director, Attila Till.

Whilst, on one rather simplistic level, this is the story of a hit man and his two willing accomplices, it is on another far more nuanced level, the depiction of the daily ordeals experienced by those living with severe disabilities.

Zolika (Zoltán Fenyvesi), a young man with serious spinal issues, lives in a care home along with his best friend and Cerebral Palsy sufferer, Barba Papa (Ádám Fekete).

Barba Papa’s ability to walk, albeit in an ungainly fashion, makes him decidedly able-bodied compared to Zolika, whose back condition leaves him permanently confined to a wheelchair, and often to his bed.

There is a ray of light however for Zolika as his estranged father has agreed to fund corrective life-saving surgery for him, but Zolika harbours great anger towards the man who effectively abandoned him during his childhood, and whilst being in danger of cutting off his nose to spite his face, Zolika point-blank refuses to accept any such help, much to the chagrin of his concerned and doting mother. Zolika will need to raise the money himself, but how?

Meanwhile, we are introduced to Rupaszov, a man that has suffered a partial paralysis of his own. He too is wheelchair-bound. Previously a fireman, a work accident and its subsequent after effects have seen the poor man’s world and well-being fall apart, and he has descended into a dark state of bitterness, chaos and criminality.

Zolika and Barba Papa lack focus and drive in their lives, but a chance fractious encounter with Rupaszov leads to these two eager, wide-eyed innocents being taken under the ex-jailbird’s wing.

Though clearly an act of absent-minded madness to any right-thinking person, by teaming up with Rupaszov the young pair see an ideal opportunity to give some meaning to their lives which up until now have been very much defined by what they can’t do. They volunteer to aid Rupaszov in his work as a hired hit man for Serbian drug baron, Rados (Dusán Vitanovics). This decision alone would appear to be problematic enough, but Rados – with three decidedly tetchy Rottweilers for company – not only gives this collaborative idea the big thumbs-down, he then proceeds to administer Rupaszov with the most ruthless of ultimatums.

The chief success of Tiszta Svívvel is its ability to switch confidently and effectively between the thoughtful, the action-packed and the at times downright ridiculous, blending as it does a curious mixture of brutality with darkly humorous observational comedy. Underpinning all of this, however, there is a genuinely compassionate heart to this film which beats hard and true.

Zoltán Fenyvesi and Ádám Fekete put in commendable performances as Rupaszov’s helpers in what are perhaps, through no fault of their own, slightly limited roles, whilst Szabolcs Thuróczy’s performance as the embittered Rupaszov carries sufficient weight to convince as a man in the throes of a personal crisis; a man who can no longer find peace or any sense of meaning in his life.

Be it the challenge of pressing the correct buttons on a vending machine with a hand so severely affected by spasticity, being likened to the much loved Star Wars duo, R2D2 and C3PO, or Rupaszov simply watching with unaffected indifference as a knife is plunged into one of his paralysed legs, Attila Till’s script and direction never shies away from acknowledging the more comedic side and frequent absurdity of the trio’s daily plight as they lurch from one awkward scenario to another owing to their collective hampered physicality.

That said, for them to even attempt feats that would present a challenge to even the peak condition able-bodied amongst us, is testament to the group’s inner strength of belief and a refusal to give in – something that is very much a core theme of Till’s engaging film.

Tiszta Svívvel offers not just a tongue-in-cheek, light-hearted and refreshingly original take on the gangster flick, but more importantly, provides a spirited and uplifting lens through which we can view disability, and its impact upon those who must live with it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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