GIFTED

“…Director, Marc Webb, uses his strongly-commercial touch to good effect here…”

Wayward Wolf.

 

On paper, Gifted offers nothing particularly new to the tug-of love emotional drama genre, but so well realised is this charming little film, that thankfully such a potential issue never really springs to mind, or if it does, it’s never really able to take root.

Frank Adler (Chris Evans), lives with his niece, Mary (McKenna Grace), in a modest, slightly dishevelled house in Florida. Mary, as the film’s title suggests, is a particularly gifted child, streets ahead of her peer group, academically-speaking.

Home-schooled for her entire life to date, the time has come – at her father’s insistence – for her to attend a conventional school. This however soon exposes her father’s worst fears, and indeed justifies his decision to enrol her there. Mary is severely lacking in social skills, unaware of how to properly integrate within her own age group.

With Mary’s best friend being a ‘sassy’ middle-aged neighbour, Roberta (Octavia Spencer), it’s clear that the youngster has had something of an unconventional upbringing, something that her father is keen to address by ensuring that she learns to socialise more with her own age group.

Of course, balancing this with the need to ensure that Mary’s remarkable gift for mathematics is suitably nurtured is the tricky part, but Frank is determined, for the good of his daughter, to make it work somehow.

Of course, nobody had banked on Frank’s now estranged mother in law, Evelyn (Lindsay Duncan), suddenly appearing out of nowhere, putting a spanner in Frank’s plans, insistent that her late daughter (Mary’s mother) would have wanted Mary to attend a special school for particularly gifted children. Her proposal that Mary uproots and comes to live with her, goes down like a lead balloon with Frank, but he is all the time wary of the need to do right by Mary, and thus, is faced with something of a major moral conundrum.

Ultimately, it is evident that all involved must not let their own emotional baggage dictate what is best for the child. Something that is always going to be easier said than done.

As mentioned previously, Gifted doesn’t bring anything particularly new to the table, and whilst it may hint at some of the moral and emotional dilemmas explored so devastatingly in the likes of, say, Kramer vs Kramer, it does so on an altogether more superficial level.

That, however, is not necessarily a bad thing, and Director, Marc Webb, uses his strongly-commercial touch to good effect here, making this piece both emotionally affecting and accessible, not to mention genuinely amusing in places.

With an impressive cast with whom one can truly relate – McKenna Grace in particular excels as the precocious child prodigy – Gifted stands up well as a charming little drama conveying an overall sentiment that is sincere, reassuring and above all, convincing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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